Waterfalls of Sri Lanka

Beautiful waterfalls cascading down the mountain slopes enhance the beauty of the hill country. The geographical formation of the Island with the central highland sloping down to the coastal plains has resulted in several rivers and streams starting from the central region flowing down the hilly slopes in a radial pattern, creating beautiful waterfalls in several places in the hill country.


Bambarakanda Fall

Bambarakanda Falls is the tallest waterfall in Sri Lanka. With a height of 263 m (863 ft), it ranks as the 299th highest waterfall in the world. It is located in Kalupahana in the Badulla District. The waterfall was formed by Kuda Oya, which is a branch of the Walawe River. The Bambarakanda Falls can be found in a forest of pine trees.


Dunhinda Fall

Dunhinda Falls is a waterfall located about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) away from Badulla town. The Dunhinda Falls is one of Sri Lanka's most beautiful waterfalls. The waterfall, which is 210 feet (64 m) high gets its name from the smoky dew drops spray, (Dun in sinhala means mist or smoke) which surrounds the area at the foot of the waterfall. The water fall is created by the river called Badulu Oya which goes through the Badulla town.

To reach the water fall you have to walk more than 1 km distance along a foot path. Along this foot path you can see another small waterfall called Kuda Dunhinda at a distance. However, walking along this muddy foot path is really worth as the waterfall is so beautiful. Along this foot path there are many native venders selling herbal drinks to refresh and rest yourself. At the end of the path there is a secure stage constructed for viewers to see the waterfall. If you are brave enough you can reach the foot of the waterfall and cross the river and see the most beautiful view of the fall.


Bopath Ella Fall

Bopath Ella is a waterfall situated in the Ratnapura District of Sri Lanka. It has a shape very similar to the leaf of the sacred fig or "Bo" tree, which has earned it this name. The waterfall is a major tourist attraction in the country. Local myths say that it is haunted and that it hides a treasure trove. The name "Bopath Ella" has been given to the waterfall because of its shape. The water flows through a narrow gap in the rocks and then widens, forming the shape of a leaf of a "Bo" tree which is the Sinhalese name for sacred fig. "Path" means leaves of a tree and "Ella" means waterfall. Virgin forests with a rich biodiversity surround the waterfall. Bopath Ella is 30 metres (98 ft) high. It is formed from the Kuru Ganga, which is a tributary of the Kalu Ganga. Bopath Ella is a major tourist attraction in Sri Lanka, since it is not far from the capital, Colombo, and is easily accessible. The path to the waterfall is lined with a number of shops and stalls, and it is somewhat polluted because of this commercialization.

Ramboda Fall

Ramboda Falls is 109m high and 11th highest waterfall in Sri Lanka and 729th highest waterfall in the world. It is situated in Pussellawa area, on the A5 highway at Ramboda Pass. It formed by Panna Oya which is a tributary of Kothmale Oya. Altitude of the falls is 945m above sea level.


Devon Fall

Devon Falls is situated 6 km west of Talawakele, Nuwara Eliya District on A7 highway. The falls is named after a pioneer English coffee planter called Devon, whose plantation is situated nearby the falls. The Waterfall is 97 metres high and ranked 19th highest in the Island. The fall formed by Kothmale Oya, a tributary of Mahaweli River. Altitude of Devon falls is 1,140m above sea level.


St. Clair's Fall

St. Clair's fall is one the widest waterfalls in Sri Lanka. St. Clair's fall is called the "Little Niagara of Sri Lanka” and it is one of the most politically discussed environmental entities in Sri Lanka. It is situated 3 km west of the town of Talawakele on the Hatton-Talawakele Highway in Nuwara Eliya District. The falls derived its name from a nearby tea estate. The fall is 80m high and hence 20th highest waterfall in Sri Lanka. St. Clair's falls comprises two falls called "Maha Ella" (Sinhalese "The Greater Fall") and "Kuda Ella," (Sinhalese "The Lesser Fall") which is 50m high and was created by a tributary of Kotmale Oya.


Laxapana Fall

Laxapana Falls is 126m high and the 8th highest waterfall in Sri Lanka and 625th highest waterfall in the world. It is situated in Hatton area in Nuwara Eliya District. It formed by Maskeliya Oya near the confluence of Kehelgamuwa Oya and Maskeliya Oya which forms Kelani River. The Falls gives its name to twin Hydro electricity Power stations, Laxapana which generates 50MW of electricity and New Laxapana which generates 100MW. Popular folklore says this place where Buddha mended his saffron robe when he was visiting Sri Pada. The name of the Falls derived from Sinhala words of "Laxa" means Hundred thousand and "Pahana" or "Pashana" means rock.

Baker's Fall

Baker's fall is a famous waterfall in Sri Lanka. It is situated in Horton Plains National Park on a tributary of the Belihul Oya. The height of the Baker's waterfalls is 20 metres (66 ft). The falls were named after Sir Samuel Baker, who was a famous explorer. Many Rhododendron and Fern bushes can be seen around the waterfall.


Diyaluma water fall

Diyaluma water fall is 220m high and the second highest waterfall in Sri Lanka and 361st highest waterfall in the world. It is situated 6 km away from Koslanda in Badulla District off on Colombo-Badulla highway. The water fall is formed by Punagala Oya, a tributary of Kuda Oya which in turn, is a tributary of Kirindi Oya. In Sinhalese, Diyaluma or Diya Haluma means "rapid flow of water". According to Dr.R.L. Brohier, the famous historian, Diyaluma is the setting of the folklore about a tragedy involving a young King and a young woman of a low-caste.


Ravana Fall

The Ravana Falls (popularly known as Ravana Ella in Sinhala) is a popular sightseeing attraction in Sri Lanka. It currently ranks as one of the widest falls in the country. This waterfall measures approximately 25 m (82 ft) in height and cascades from an oval-shaped concave rock outcrop. During the local wet season, the waterfall turns into what is said to resemble an areca flower with withering petals. But this is not the case in the dry season, where the flow of water reduces dramatically. The falls is located 6 km (3.7 mi) away from the local railway station. The falls have been named after the legendary Sinhala king Ravana, which is connected to the famous Indian epic, the Ramayana. According to legend, it is said that Ravana (who was the king of Sri Lanka at the time) had kidnapped princess Sita, and had hidden her in the caves behind this waterfall, now simply known as the Ravana Ella Cave. The reason for the kidnapping is said to be a revenge for slicing off the nose of his sister by Rama (husband of Sita) and his brother Laxmana. At the time, the cave was surrounded with thick forests in the midst of wilderness. It is also believed that Rama’s queen bathed in a pool that accumulated the water falling from this waterfall.

Back to Featured Articles

©2014 Future Sri Lanka, All Rights Reserved.